Every day now we hear new numbers about the pandemic: rising numbers of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths. As the days get shorter, the nights longer, a sense of uncertainty grows within us. Some of us may be keeping vigil at home, waiting for news of a loved one alone in the hospital. Others hold losses in their hearts. Many are coping with economic uncertainty, racial unrest, or the devastation of extreme weather events.

On top of all that is the concern about the consequences of having a conservative Supreme Court. It is a dark time.

Yet darkness cannot hide the points of light that have emerged over the last four years. Many more people, young and old, have stepped forward to participate in the recent election. Many people, young and old, have demonstrated against racial oppression. Many have told the world that climate change matters, that our government must take action. Increasing numbers of people are speaking out about the inequities of health care. Young people are waking up to the threats to their sexual and reproductive health, rights, and justice.

Grandmothers have developed resilience over the years. The world needs that resilience. We have learned how to speak to the truth. Our voices have grown louder. Experience has shown the value of uniting with others. We delight in championing our children and grandchildren. They join us as we work to protect their rights to reproductive justice.

Confined at home, we have learned that there are multiple ways to reach out to others. The telephone, email, social media, virtual meetings online have woven a network to bridge the isolation of “stay at home” policies. More and more people are learning to use Zoom and other such apps. We can go to meetings all over the country without leaving home. Granted, we can’t share hugs to offer condolence or celebrate a victory, but we can see each other. GRR! is developing educational and organizational materials to share across states. We continually explore ways to advocate for policies that will help diminish healthcare inequities and injustices.

When the world seems dark, we can look to nature to give us hope. In the darkness, we can see the stars which are not visible during the day. The winter solstice comes soon, and days will grow longer again.

So if the world seems dark now, remember, the darkness allows us to see the stars. A new day will come.